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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 22, 2013 6:00am-8:59am EDT

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good morning, everybody. tuesday october good morning, e. brian shactman here. what is that? listen -- i don't know what happened. your headlines is related to the onions which had the wittiest headlines for the obama care. new obama care program released on floppy disks. mr. movie phone replacing the obama care website. "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ fewer than one in ten people who tried to sign up in the first week were actually able to complete the process. that's a success rate of less than 10%. how low is it.
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according to a recent poll more of this country believes obama care has been repealed than have been able to sign up for obama care. [ laughter ] the whole point of websites is to design them so it is nearly impossible to not sign up for something. every time i go to amazon i'll mistakenly sign up for six seasons of "night court." are you sure you want to leave this page? yes. oops, it turns out i ordered something. >> good morning, everyone, it's tuesday, october 22nd. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set we have former communications director for president george w. bush nicole wallace. msnbc contributor mike barnacle. thought you were is going to colombia? >> i am. >> and in washington, pulitzer prize winning columnist and msnbc political analyst eugene
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robinson. >> that's what you do. you are the president of the united states and you can call anybody. nixon even called elvis got him over to the white house. i'm serious. this is how leaders think. so i'm doing this. >> anything is possible. >> your president -- you can call anybody. you can bezos. listen, i see that you can actually run america now from your app on my iphone. i can buy anything i want in america. can you make it so people can sign up? but the floppy disk thing. you need 35 floppy disks. i have those and then i have the eight set dvd set of the bible. i get it -- i just lay it out. then maybe if i have some slim whitman songs. >> the president was pitching.
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giving out the 800 number. >> you hear what happened. >> he gives out 2800 number. >> stop it. >> they called 2800 number. they can't get through. people who get through -- you get through the first layer what do they tell them to do. go visit the website. >> you're on to something because amazon eventual carries everything so maybe amazon can start selling obama care. because in the beginning amazon only had a few products but now literally anything you want from anywhere else the amazon website is better. maybe amazon.com can carry obama care. >> we're not even talking about the final product. i ordered shoes on amazon. so people say but it's just shoes. right. we're just talking about the order. you can't even get through. >> do you think you can order another pair and at least stop?
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please. >> really quickly, mike. i want to ask nicole a question really quickly. if the president of the united states when your communications director goes out there and you write in there tell them to call this number and everybody calls that number all the news organizations and it's busy and it keeps staying busy and then when people get through go back to the website. i'm just curious, what would w -- >> not a good day to be the communications director who wrote that number into the president's remarks. >> how do they keep making these mistakes? >> well, again, i don't think they are solely communications -- >> hold on a second. i under your administration might have missed one or two things, a war, a hurricane. so don't tweet. that's why i go to you, you speak from experience. >> i have been to this movie where things go awry in the second term. >> we all understand, okay.
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iraq, katrina. she's an expert at this. >> you read them all last night. >> harriett meyers. what's when the communications director says do this and the president does that and then busy signals and three journalists that get through thank you for getting through, please go to our health care site, healthercare.gov. >> not a good day. the president, i'm sure is already very mad at his staff and everyone around him. but the fact that the clean up -- what they are trying to do now is cleanup a disastrous roll out because now that the shutdown is over people are focused on how badly this roll out went and the fact that they can't get the clean up right. >> you're coming in for a landing. you're having flashbacks to '05.
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it's bad. all right. mike, we'll get into this in a second. >> you know the problem when you call the 800 number and it's a call center in india -- that's where all the call centers are located. you call for a refrigerator you get somebody from india. >> they didn't do that. but they spent a couple hundred dollars on a canadian firm. >> your done? that was a great tease for a story we have a little later in the newscast. we'll start with the front page headline in "usa today," congress control may be up for grabs. according to a "usa today" princeton survey poll 47% of americans say congress would work member if every member was replaced next year during the mid-term elections. only 4% say congress would be changed for the worse if all members were replaced. the left think it would make no difference. the figure is similar to but higher than past election years
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when the minority party won control of the house. in 1994 when democrats lost control of the house the number was at 40%. according to cnn, 54% democrats think members don't deserve to be reelected, republicans, 75% think they don't deserve to be re-elected. just last week the cook political report said 14 seats that are up for grabs next year are now leaning democrat because of the damage done to the gop. so, obviously, some of these numbers, gene, are not surprising. what are the opportunities here? >> well, you know, the opportunity is potentially to take back control of the house, which did not seem to be even remotely in the cards for democrats, frankly, before the shutdown and this whole drama.
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and put it back in play, perhaps just as important it tends to take the senate out of play for the republican party and the republicans had a shot at it. this was politically a very bad thing for the republican party. but, there's time. it's a year and that's two eternities in politics so things can change. right now going into it this is not good for the republican party at all. >> i love escalating leading questions, we're asking in the polls how much do you hate congress. would you replace every member. would you put them in an unmarked grave. 47% said yes. we get the idea. no one likes congress. nicole, do you believe as a lot of people has said this has big impacts in 2014 or the other side of the argument is it will be forgotten by then and it will be about something else? >> i find the pace of the news cycle disorienting.
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if you remember 11 weeks ago all we talked about here for maybe a whole three years was obama's very muddled leadership on the red line he had drawn for syria. i think it's a little disorienting how consumed we get. i think nature of governing by crisis is you can't predict the effects on public opinion of these all consuming news cycles. >> think about it when people go to the voting booth. this is what we got to figure out as you're looking at this. think about the message out of the government shutdown. government doesn't work. right? >> right. >> this comes on the heels of syria and red line. nsa stories. the drone story that's come out this morning. the irs story that's come out. the ap story. the james rossen story. benghazi. there's one after another, after another, after another. >> the billions of dollars wasted by republicans shutting
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down the government. there's that too. the other side. >> there's that too. but it's so -- there are so many of these stories, though. the question is, why at the end of the day do people hold on to it. >> what conclusion do they draw? mika, i don't disagree with you about the effects of the shutdown but is it -- >> and on the economy. i was watching -- >> when was the last time that led the news the economy. >> i was watching my daughter's soccer game yesterday afternoon and a guy came up to me. he had a bad taste of having a 10-year-old on the other side he was cheering for. what do you think. we were talking at halftime. he's a business guy. he's always been republican. he said, i'm not supporting these people and my friends aren't supporting these people any more until they stop governing by crisis every two months. he was like i can't figure out
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what to do in the next three months, six months, nine months. that's another thing. >> if those voices rise up and the narrative that they string together is that this democrat led senate and democratic president have contributed to that economic insecurity or lack of ability to predict and make business decisions then that doesn't necessarily go towards the democrats benefit either. we're in a position where neither party should be resting on their laurels and heading into the mid-terms with confidence. >> but you have to ask yourself don't you, gene, the poll, the poll numbers we just saw is such a generic question, been asked for years and people answer the same way, i hate what congress is doing, they are ineffective, inefficient and yet they like their own member of congress and
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re-elect their own member of congress. >> that's the eternal result of those polls and as a result we get the same old congress. occasionally, though, there's a wave. and, you know, there was the tea party wave and before that there was the democratic wave and, joe, you came in on a wave. so these things do happen. >> amazing what waves bring in. it was great until we created another wave because we did what people just did a couple of weeks ago. >> did you get anything out of it? >> these are wave numbers right now. it's a long time but these are wave numbers. >> mika, if this was happening, if we have these numbers a year from now we can say with confidence that congress was going to get routed. >> i actually think long term there may be some opportunity if the party would actually take the advice of some of the people in it who like to actually win elections. >> i don't see that happening
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right now. >> i don't see it happening right now. i still see a complete and utter blindness among some members. >> when i see online over the weekend people actually at some respected conservative outlets saying the reason this didn't work was because the senate didn't stand united with ted cruz. >> do they not understand the process? >> it is such ignorance. it is such complete willful -- it's willful ignorance or they are lying, they are subscribers will get excited because even if they had stood shoulder to shoulder the president would have vetoed it. they couldn't have overridden a veto. they could never do a majority. they were never going to do that even if all the senators. so instead of saying listen we should have listened to you guys, we screwed up and lost 20 percentage points in our approval ratings and both the
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lowest approval ratings ever. they don't have to say i was right because i was or krauthammer or walker or tom coburn, all of us were right. the "wall street journal" editorial page don't have to say the "wall street journal" editorial page was right. just be quiet. you know, clean the rooms. learn from their mistakes and stop being stupid. i'm cool. let's just pretend it never happened and work towards winning next year. they won't do that. because now they are saying we were right, we were right. no they weren't right. constitutionally, the great irony of these people oh, i love the constitution -- why don't you just read the first three articles of the constitution and call me in the morning. review. >> mike barnacle. >> joe and nicole, who in the republican party has enough of a voice, strength of voice to stand up and tell people like ted cruz look at what we missed by doing the government
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shutdown. >> jeb bush tried on sunday. >> they don't listen. when the money people come in and say to some of these guys yeah i know you are ahead 60-40 but i'll come in and fund a primary opponent and guess what he's going to be pro life, he'll be pro gun, he'll be pro family, he'll be pro tax cuts but he's going to give a businessman or business woman who won't put a gun to my business's head every three months and i'll keep funding them. 30 second commercials against you. we'll gut you. that's when it has an impact. they are not going to listen to jeb. they are not listening to chris christie. they are not listening to anybody. >> what's clear is that people like ted cruz are not worried about what you're talking about. it's the republican brand. they are not worried about a
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national brand. ted cruz goes back to texas. we saw the pictures yesterday. his approval rating is 70%. he's not thinking big picture. >> this is about ted cruz and he had an interview yesterday and a lot of people didn't see it. he had an interview where he showed his hand for the first time where he said i know about negotiating. i wanted to take the hard line and then i wanted someone to come in behind me and take a more pragmatic position. he wasn't saying that on 30 second commercials and he was skewering a lot of people who could have been pragmatic and come within a deal in the middle. but i think you're going to soly see -- 8,000 people -- ted cruz didn't just want to be senator the rest of his life and knows he has got to make that turn. how do i know? i know. >> does he know he did damage to our country? >> no.
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>> does he know -- >> there are a lot of people that believe ted cruzzing brought this to the forefront. and our country is a big, resilient country. there are democrats and liberals that have done worse things to our country and managed to survive. so we'll survive like a shutdown. >> i don't think we can afford another one and we can't afford another government by crisis. everyone says it can't happen again. i want to know how it doesn't given -- >> better not. >> it's not the end of the world as we know it. it could be the end of the republican party's chances in '14 and '16. that's the thing. they are hurting themselves. i remember talking to one of my college professors and i was a huge ronald reagan fan and i made the mistake what do you think about reagan because reagan was way ahead of mondale.
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he said i think the united states of america is strong enough to survive even eight years of ronald reagan. i was so crest fallen but it was a revelation to me that he thought the world, gene, was going to hell at the same time i thought this was the greatest thing that had ever happened. for the country. and we will survive this shutdown or that shutdown but what so many of my friends on my side don't realize they are hurting themselves. we've seen this before some times. they are setting themselves up for a democratic monopoly in washington, d.c. in 2014. >> yeah. they are trying their best to take themselves out of this game. take themselves off the field and they are being egged on by some voices that either didn't
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exist or in previous times like this or that have changed like the heritage foundation, for example. which, you know, you would think ought to be coming out with those sort of reasonable policies. you would have expected heritage to be saying here's a republican idea for health care. here's our idea for something that's better than obama care and it would have assumed that we have a problem and here's a way to solve it. in fact they did that years ago and came up with romney care/obama care but they don't believe in that any more. they would have come up with something new. now they are one of the loudest voices thanks to jim demint and heritage which used to be a real think tank now is a shrill voice that's not happening. >> we talked so much and heard brilliant advice about your party we never got the obama
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care sound bites. that's too bad. coming up on "morning joe" the newest member of the msnbc family, ronan farrow will be here. also henry louis gates, peter baker and later michael hainey gives us a new look at the edition of "gq." up next the top stories in the political playbook but first here's bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> looks like that world series forecast for boston looks very dicey as we go throughout wednesday and thursday night. first, the cold air. we're tracking it through the great lakes. it's winter coat weather, jackets, hats and gloves all through areas from minneapolis to green bay. look at chicago this morning, 26. all of this is what's heading to the east coast eventually. now as far as the rain goes
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there's some in the southeast today, umbrellas needed definitely north florida, southern portions of georgia. not a huge rain event but dreary and a little bit on the cool side. heaviest rain moving into tallahassee, savannah, charleston for the afternoon. west coast you're fantastic. one more nice mild day here from boston all the way to d.c. and i mentioned that world series forecast. look at the temperatures in boston. the game will be wednesday evening and thursday evening. 50 degrees with drizzle around. during the game wind chills in the upper 30s. definitely cold. typical world series weather. east coast, everyone, enjoy one more mildish type day because that cold in the great lakes is heading your way tomorrow. you're watching "morning joe". the american dream is of a better future,
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all right. 24 past the hour. time now to take a look at the morning papers. las vegas review journal another community is coming to grips with a school shooting. that's left two people dead including the shooter. it happened in the town of sparks, nevada yesterday around 7:00 a.m. an armed student opened fire on two classmates killing the math teacher who tried to protect them. he then turned the gun on himself. two wounded students are in stable condition. michael landsberry is being hailed as a hero. a former marine and national guardman he leaves behind a wife and two step daughters. he was 45. >> the "chicago sun-times" a mother from chicago is taking twoi twitter to court after her daughter was bullied. she wants the company to reveal the names of the people
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involved. she said her phone number was listed and encouraged others to sends her sex. >> "the washington post" netflix says its profits quadrupled in the third quarter creating a jump in its shares. the online video streaming service gained more than a million new subscribers in the u.s. bringing its users to 45 million worldwide. it can be linked to original content and orange is the new black. from "san francisco chronicle" apple will announce new gadgets to showcase in san francisco. insiders anticipate the ipad 5 and an ipad mini with retina display. the release date for a new operating system for mac computers and mac laptops. the "chicago sun-times" the head stone of an iraq war veteran have been removed at an
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ohio cemetery that says the marker is inappropriate. the seven-foot gravestone is shaped as a smiling spongebob squarepants. the cemetery said the employee who approved the design made an error in judgment. officials are offering the family compensation for the gravestone and an identical one next to you. the "salt lake tribune," the boy scouts fired two leaders who filmed themselves toppling an ancient boulder. the men said they tossed the boulder because they were worried it could fall on somebody. but the boy scouts said they violated the leave no trace rule. the men could still face criminal charges. ringo starr is asking for help on his quest to fund the identities of the people in this photo, ringo took the photo during the beatles first trip to
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the u.s. back in 1964 when their cars passed each other on the freeway. it's part of his new limited edition photo book called photograph. he believes it may have been taken in miami. if you recognize anyone in the photo head over to genesis website. >> imagine 1964, the beatles. >> that's so cool. >> at the peak of the frenzy. driving down the road and ringo starr takes your picture. that's a great shot. let's go to willie now with politico. >> let's go politico, playbook politico editor-in-chief john harris. you guys have a piece up about the virginia race, michael bloomberg of new york city is now getting involved in that gubernatorial contest pumping some money from his group into the race. how will that impact things >> he'll drop a million point one which is not just pocket change where terry mcauliffe
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bill clinton friend and democrat is up over conservative republican ken cuccinelli. i don't see this having a huge effect on the race. i find it surprising. terry mcauliffe made homage to michael bloomberg in august and happy for his help. i've been covering virginia for 25 years. cultural liberal new york mayor helping a demonstrate in the state is a puzzle to me. >> if you got an eight point spread with two weeks to go, terry mcauliffe courted michael bloomberg. do you think that's wise with an eight-point lead? >> we'll see. mcauliffe's position on gun control, if you go issue by issue are popular. but the last thing he wants to do especially like terry who doesn't really have -- still battling the carpet bagger reputation in virginia, the last thing you want to be doing is seen as a national democrat rather than a virginia democrat.
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so i would really see this as at best a toss up and to be honest last think he wants is mark prior where bloomberg's money creates a backlash and helps republican. >> cuccinelli campaign is jumping on this saying tens of millions of dollars coming from outside of the state. >> another interesting piece you guys have up you guys interviewed nancy pelosi. she said she's quote on a mission. what did she mean by that? >> on a mission not a shift. i'm not going anywhere. a lot of people are wondering pelosi at her age in her early 70s, on the last lap. she gave us the exact opposite impression and so did her associates in the house people that know her. they think she wants to stay through obama's term and possibly beyond. she is totally buoyed in the wake of the shutdown she thinks democrats have a better chance than ever to take back the
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house. certainly in 2014 if not certainly 2016. she wants to stick around until she's speaker again. >> it could happen. john harris with a look at the political playbook. coming up not exactly must watch tv last night on monday night football but it was a football game so you watched it anyway. giants looking for their first win against the vikings next. [ tires screech ] ♪ [ male announcer ] 1.21 gigawatts. today, that's easy. ge is revolutionizing power. supercharging turbines with advanced hardware and innovative software. using data predictively to help power entire cities. so the turbines of today... will power us all...
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♪ last night the question was asked are you ready for some football. america said, yeah, sure. giants looking for their first win of the season hosting the vikings. one win for the vikings, no wins for the giants. monday night football from the meadowlands. a holding call on the giants. second quarter eli manning hits randall for the score, giants go up 10-7 at that point. josh freeman just signed this week to be the quarterback for the vikings was not good. here in the third picked off.
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freeman 20-53 passing. later in the third vikings final punt giants get possession at the three-yard line and their newly acquired quarterback punches it in. >> ugly football. i want to say. >> lead 17-7. defense there held adrian peterson to 28 yards. that was the upside to all this. new york giants get their first win. >> wow. >> 23-7. they are now 1-6. follow up to the other new york team. controversial penalty. rex ryan said they knew about fiduciary. the team alerted officials to be on the lookout for are the personal foul on the field goal. it was called. jets got another chance and kicked the winning field goal. bill belichick admitted to espn that quote, obviously we're wrong. he said it was the right call. this was the first time a
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penalty was called. just enacted this offseason. the nfl is mourning the loss of bud adams. the team announced the 90-year-old died of natural causes. adams is one of the founder of the afl and a key merger with the nfl. he moved the team to tennessee in 1997 and eventually changed the team name to the titans. "forbes" magazine estimated the titans value at more than $1 billion a team he bought for 25 grand. this year's poll of the nfl's most disliked players is out. any guesses. most disliked player. >> randy moss >> keep guessing. >> "forbes" magazine lists mark sanchez at number five. ben roethlisberger at number four. ndamukong suh, plays dirty
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sometimes. manti te'o. at number one the most disliked player in the nfl is michael vick. >> what's that about? >> unacceptable. >> that dogfighting thing. >> don't hate him. >> people love their dogs. >> earned his way out of prison. >> i can't tell you how many people did things and never went to prison -- i don't know. just whatever. >> he's done really well in the last two or three years at every level. >> his privilege is he gets to play football he doesn't get to be liked. people love dogs period. >> love dogs. >> obviously you don't. >> here's a happier story. one unlikely recruit could be gracing an ncaa basketball court next season.
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this is zach. he was born without the lower half of his left arm and committed to south florida on saturday. he'll play s.e.c. basketball, 6'4", 200 pounds. he was recruited from several schools. but he thought he would get a better chance to play and see the court playing for the gators. pretty cool. coming up next he's a writer, lawyer, diplomat and the newest host right here at-nbc, not bad for a 25-year-old, ronan farrow joins us for the must read opinion pages. >> how old is he? >> like 13. what are you doing. avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive"
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♪ thousands of people are signing up and saving money as we speak. the affordable care act is not just a website. it's much more. people are rushing to see what's available. and those who already had a chance to enroll are thrilled with the result and you can get your questions answered by real people 24 hours a day in 150 different languages. 1-800-318-2596. i want to repeat that. 1-800-318-2596. once you get on phone with a train representative it usually takes 25 minutes for an individual to apply for coverage, to free families from the pervasive fear, the one
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illness -- i got you. you're okay. this happens when i talk too long. >> oh, my goodness. >> wow. >> 43 past the hour. here with us now the newest member of the msnbc family ronan farrow. welcome, welcome, welcome. congratulations. >> she wanted to pass out behind the president. >> i think she's okay. >> that was the highlight watching him rescue her. >> it got worse from there. she was okay. for the president, gave that number, willie. >> did you get the number? >> act now. >> get your sham now if you act now. >> when you call the number it tells you to go the website. let's get the most read opinion pages and i'll start with "wall street journal." 1-800-obama care denial. by the way we called the hotline on monday and the automaticed menu redirected us to
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healthercare.gov which in turn to get in touch with someone in a call center. in an era where google is make self-driving cars and amazon offers next day deliver for just about everything, the white house plunged ahead with a system it knew to be defective and is relying on the technology that's 19th-century as the fall back. five days before the exchanges launched the health and human services department increased the virginia information technology company serco's $114 million contract by $87 million to help process paper applications. >> people who can use the internet which are people we need to enroll. that's not is going happen if the current favorability numbers stay in play. 46% views it as a serious problem. 56% feels it's bigger problems
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with the law. the administration really has to get out there i feel especially to college campuses and talk to those young healthy people. >> the only way this thing works in the long run you sign up people that are healthy. people like me not my age but your age. >> you look great, joe. >> i do look great. it's just a show. >> dying inside. >> i'm dying inside. we all are. we'll talk philosophy next time. but, what blows my mind is, they know. this is like the one big thing the president has passed. this is -- he'll be judged by this in history. they knew this was coming. it wasn't like -- they knew this date was coming. they spent money. it didn't work. what blows my mind is on top of that they are in the middle of the crisis. they give the president a phone number that doesn't work. >> it's a real problem and i think it stems from much broader more systemic issues. there are republicans on the hill saying get kathleen
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sebelius to resign. that won't solve the bigger problems which is the competitive bidding process for these huge over priced contracts is beltway bandits get them. a very black belt process. >> did they have a competitive bidding process. >> it's british and $1.2 billion contract. they receive all their money from government, 90% of their income is from government deals. one of the companies feeding off government teats. >> the canadian company, we're not sure, we had the nbc report last week on that. i think there's some good american companies, gene robinson, that, i don't know, a few good tech start up guys and women over here. you go back, to again, like the "wall street journal" said, you just go back and you look. are you trying call -- >> am. >> it's too early.
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seriously. i say this all the time. i go on my iphone, do my banking on my iphone and buy just about everything from amazon. like we got americans that know how to do this stuff. >> yeah. you know i work for the guy now so i would be happy to give jeff a call and see if he would like to step in and fix the thing. although it is -- i am amused. >> you're tight with bezos. >> yeah, exactly. you know, this is ridiculous. i have a feeling the whole architecture of this is wrong and needs to lay out a design, a new one. it's a bit rich for "wall street journal" to say obama care is awful, it's terrible, it's horrible and why isn't it working better? why don't we have more of it now. so it's a bit of a contradiction. >> gene, the point of the "wall street journal" editorial is the
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point that republicans have been making for a very long time which is that it's not appropriate for the federal government to assume a bigger role in the health care. mika has just gotten through. >> it took me 20 seconds. thank you so much. have a good day. >> there you go. >> she got tagt. up and running. >> so call. >> did they refer to you healthercare.gov. >> no it was a live person. >> about one minute. >> less than. >> that was chris christie's number. >> no it wasn't. >> you were talking to chris. >> no i wasn't. >> it was valerie. >> i think the bigger story that's getting lost here is these bidding processes for these huge contractses are deeply flawed. the american public needs pay more attention to it. they are too much of a black box. there's no transparency about how this happens. >> by the way, and i'm not
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knocking public union, i'm not, god knows i do that enough. not here. i understand we have unions for a reason. but if this had happened in the private-sector everybody would be fired. walk in and fire everybody on the floor. get out there was. they would hire, start over immediately. and it would be fixed. like don't tell me if steve jobs had a disastrous launch on monday that that stuff wouldn't be working by friday. we got to figure out a way -- >> yeah. >> yeah, i'm sorry. gene, really quickly? >> i was curious. is this a union firm? do you know that be a fact? i don't know how unions got involved. >> it's a government operation. i'm guessing, gene, it's just a wild guess that probably there are union connections on a
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contract awarded and run by the federal government. >> well -- >> i would be glad to bet you. i'll bet you if i'm right you and jeff bezos have to put me in the "the washington post" box for the opening game of the -- >> we're the nationals now. we'll see what we can do. you know, i think more relevant perhaps to this discussion is civil service rules which the fed bipartisan support for many decades that make it difficult to walk into any government department and just like fire everybody. >> so civil service rules then. >> all right, by the way, unlike the "wall street journal" if you want to get through call 1-800-318-2596. you'll get an agent. ronan farrow, thank you very much. >> mika makes things happen. >> she could be making it up. >> i'm just saying i guess somebody had a bad experience but i got through.
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i'll try again. >> we're excited you're here. >> we have cool ideas for the show. it's got to pass mustard with this crowd. >> we'll love you. when is the show going to start? >> january. stay tuned. >> legal in new jersey and the "daily show" noticed just how excited senator-elect cory booker was about it. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping [ male announcer ] welcome back all the sweet things your family loves with 0-calorie monk fruit in the raw. ♪ welcome back [ male announcer ] it's made with the natural, vine-ripened sweetness of fruit, so you can serve up deliciously sweet treats without all the sugar. so let no drink go unsweetened.
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all right. here's the news you can't use. same sex couples all over my home state of new jersey enjoying their new legal right to marry. they allowed gay marriage and last night jon stewart noticed no one, no one was more excited than the u.s. senator-elect of new jersey mr. cory booker. >> the formalities are out of the way. time for the special moment that this couple have been waiting for all their lives. >> do you wish to be joined in marriage? >> yes. >> yes. >> and i wish to join you. [ laughter ] >> not in marriage but joining you together. [ laughter ] >> too late it already got weird. >> all right. you may hug your mayor.
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>> leave them alone. it's not about you. >> that's cory booker. >> what the heck? >> he's a hugger. >> that was nice. >> it was nice. >> he's a thoughtful guy. >> very exciting in a political landscape that makes you want to smash your head against the wall. >> yes, he is. >> coming up why michael hainey says the president should be freaked out over the roll out of the hearth. and jeff greenfield imagines what if jfk survived. ncer ] this is jim, a man who doesn't stand still. but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation -- an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, jim's on the move. jim's doctor recommended xarelto®.
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. even the photo op to address the poorly planned roll out of obama care suffered from a clear lack of planning. as evidenced by the decision perhaps unwise in hindsight to place the pregnant woman with diabetes in the sun next to president. good save. give the woman some water. fear not, help is on the way. >> we've had some of the best i. t. talent in the entire country join the team and we're well into a tech search to solve the problem. >> your website is so [ bleep ] we have to use the same strategy we used to salvage the iraq war.
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well, it's the top of the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." nicole wallace is still with us, joining us on the set. political analyst for yahoo! news jeff greenfield who is out with a new book "if kennedy lived." an alternate history. we'll get into that in just a moment. also with us in washington, editorial director, ron fourney. yesterday president obama defended obama care, his signature piece of legislation while admitting the roll out has been flawed. >> experts from some of america's top private-sector tech companies who by the way have seen things like this happen before, they want it to work. they are reaching out. they are offering to send help. we've had some of the best i.t. talent in the entire country join team and we're well into a tech search to fix the problem and we're confident we'll get all the problems fixed.
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so here's the bottom line. the product, the health insurance is good. the prices are good. it is a good deal. people don't just want it. they are showing up to buy it. nobody is madder than me about the fact that the website isn't working as well as it should, which means it's going to get fixed. >> the white house urges individuals having issues with the website to utilize one of their call centers. however, some reporters from the "wall street journal" and politico called immediately after the president's speech and they got a message redirecting them back to the main website. >> you called this morning. >> called this morning. >> at 6:45 in the morning. >> i got through in less than a minute. >> so if you want to get through you just need to wake up before everybody else does and it works. >> meanwhile "the washington post" says all these issues shouldn't come as a surprise to the obama administration.
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just days before going live the health care website reportedly crashed during a simulation where just a few hundred people attempted to logon. house republicans are hoping to get a little clarity about the flawed roll out of obama care when secretary kathleen sebelius was the on capitol hill next week. "the washington post" and abc news found voters are still willing to give the health care law a chance. 46% of voters support obama care and 49% are against it. and while 53% -- >> those numbers have gone up, considerably since the republican action. which is great for conservatives, the bitter irony of all this. the very people who claim to stop obama care have made it and this is a matter of math. so people can get upset if they want to, made it actually more popular. >> they did. they certainly took the attention away from this story
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which would have done the job for them. . >> driven the numbers down into the 20s. like some republicans drove our party's numbers down. >> 53% disapprove the way president obama is handling the law's rollout. 33% say it should be repealed. 66% say the law should stand even though a third say they oppose it. >> jeff, where do we start. let's start by asking how does the white house bungle this so much when they knew the day was coming and the president goes out and then we have stories of incompetence on top of incompetence on top of incompetence. . >> i think the central lesson of when administrations go wrong is that they don't to quote the music man they don't know the territory. they make assumptions, make miscalculations whether it's about the war or a massively complex program. the ultimate irony is the white house may look back in six months if we could have only kept the shutdown going six
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months longer. but the crucial question, though, and i think the numbers show it and what you've described is this, in fact, a technical problem with the website, or are we going to get to a position by the end of the year with the very people that have to enroll in order to make this work, younger, healthier people. it's a burden. i can't do it. they haven't fixled it. the entire economic structure of the health care program goes phlooey. >> they have to give a delay that the republicans who were shutting the government down get. >> in fairness we should mention it almost wouldn't have mattered how this thing rolled out. the republicans are prepared to call this thing a disaster because they have been fighting it. the description you gave of the republicans would like to have some information from kathleen sebelius, no they won't. this is an inquisition. they want to hide. >> absolutely. >> if things keep 0 going this badly they should want her to stay flight if they don't want
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the health care act to work. this comes down in large part to leadership. i worked along the gulf coast with fema and with a lot of governors over, you know, better part of four terms. i saw a lot of hurricanes come in and you could tell the difference between the governors who were real leaders and the governors who weren't. during katrina i was absolutely shocked by the gross incompetence of the governors in every state involved. and you know why? because i had seen jeb. i shouldn't say anything nice to jeb after what he said about our program like watching baby seals being beaten every day. but jeb watches us three hours a day which tells us he likes seeing baby seals being beaten. when a hurricane came in, you knew under jeb you knew what was going to happen. stay in your house. don't try to go the affected areas because he's got it blocked off.
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then you drive to middle schools because there are going to be people there handing families that don't have anything to eat or brink handing them little boxes and you think -- i'm telling you, it was pure leadership. then you go to a governor one state over, two states over and it's completely opposite. so much of this comes down to leadership and you just got to look at president obama and ask how did he allow this to be bungled so badly. he loves to blame republicans for everything. he can't blame ted cruz for this. he knew this day was coming and he botched it. the buck stops with him does it not? >> exactly. before we go there and we talk about gross incompetence and katrina the buck started and stopped with president bush. we see similarities with the way president obama handling this. my family is already benefiting from obama care. i want obama care to succeed. i want my family to be able to continue benefiting and i want 40 million americans without health insurance to get it.
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but when i see this administration spend an unforgivable amount of money on a website that doesn't work and the president of the united states gets out there yesterday and instead of taking responsibility and say i'm going to fix it and rolling heads, he diminishes the significance ever what's been happening, he points the fingers at the republicans, and doesn't really take full responsibility and hasn't. we had the secretary of hhs, a woman who i respect, identify known for a long time, kathleen sebelius, she was sitting in the front row. maybe she should have been shown the door, frankly. real quickly, mika, all the folks making money off of president obama right now who worked on the campaign and technology and state-of-the-art technology work they should be in the white house right now working for a dollar of the year. >> i don't disagree with a number of those things but didn't he say he would fix it. that was the first thing on ron's list of critic jim for the president. that's what he went out there in
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front of the country to say. >> he did take responsibility for this and he has to take responsibility. i'm assuming you agree with the fact that obama care is something that's already helping families and if you can't get this done right -- the hardest part is still coming as jeff was saying. you can't get this right how will you do the hard stuff? >> i think the statement no one is madder than me is what sticks in a lot of people's craw. the notion he's sitting and watching from the residence of the white house and says oh, gosh that didn't go well just brings really strange to people. he should have been, you know, in the command and control post, making sure that everything was in order. should he have been running his own simulation of the site obviously not. should he have made sure that his signature domestic achievement was rolled out smoothly and did he have plenty of times while the republicans
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were running a goat rodeo, he had plenty of time and space -- >> what's a goat rodeo >> a goat rodeo is -- you can use your imagination. it's a term we use all the time in the bush white house because we ran many of them. but obama, to continue to speak about the actions of his administration as a guy with a great seat but no responsibility is off putting. >> if i could on credibility just like katrina when the big problem president bush had was diminishing the significance of what was happening say hey way to go brownie, you had the president yesterday talking about glitches and kinks. this is bigger than glitches and kinks. >> katrina was a storm and health care law is obama's creation. i'm not defending my white house's handling of katrina but it was a national disaster. this was a disaster of obama's creation and imagination. >> maybe at war is a better
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analogy. >> we get it. we got a few. but we litigate iraq later in the show. jeff, let me ask you if we take the long view on this as you're particularly good at doing. if we get through this time, if the president gets through it, the website is eventually fixed as ron said 40 million americans get health care, will we remember, will history remember this period where it looked pretty bad for the white house but ended up okay according to him? >> no. i do think that this is a wonderful point to make because the over coverage of everything. that's the state of the united states, everything is over covered. everything is overstated. if they get through and by the end of the year people are enrolling particularly younger people this will be nothing like the first few weeks of medicare part d. >> unless young people don't sign up. >> if this thing is fixed and it rolls out then this is nothing. but if, in fact, this reveals
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more substantive problems that some of the critics are saying, wait until people start finding out they won't like it that's the great debate. this is a good deal for most of the people. it's a big change from the era i was writing about when there were three networks and two or three important newspapers and you had time for issues to ferment. we ought not to think this is the end of the world but it's a danger. one quick point. most second term presidents get of a flibted by things that happen in the first term. iraq war, watergate, monica lewinsky. this is a disaster for president obama if it doesn't work out. the first term agenda comes back and bites him in a sensitive place. >> ron, you were talking about your family and 40 million others impacted by this. at the end, at the end of the day this is going to either sink
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or swim if it makes people's lives better. if like medicare, medicaid, social security, it becomes a part of the american fabric because it actually works. and that has to do with pricing and markets and in get so sick and tired of people running out going oh, look, look what's happening in california, it proves this will work. look what's happening. nobody knows yet ron and we won't know for a eror two, will we >> to jeff's points there were all kinds of glitches and problems and political debate that went on for years around medicare. what's happening now is significant it tells us what's happening in the future. can fortunate and miss administration learn from this and fix the problems or do they dig in, spin and just keep in a defensive posture. you're exactly right. if we can't take the early
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successes and early defeats to reflect what's happening down the road. if this works and a good policy and implemented well great for our country, great for president obama, wonderful thing for his legacy and the country will be better. >> so jeff greenfield alternate history buff if kennedy lived take i want away. by the way what's with the obsession on alternate history. this goes way back for you. >> when i started getting obsessed about politicians shortly after i entered kindergarten, it did strike me how many times in american history these tiny little twists of fate could have had enormous consequences. franklin roosevelt almost being assassinated before he got to the white house. his assassin got to the park five minutes later, killed the mayor of chicago. it grew and grew until i started realizing that this is true
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about our personal lives how did you meet the person you spend the rest of your life with. she happened to show up at dinner at the last minute. how did you get job. it's true about history. when i started thinking about john kennedy in particular there were so many turning points in his life not just the one we obviously know about. he almost died of scarlet fever, he almost died in world war ii, he almost died from a life threatening operation, he almost died from a suicide bomber. >> and if his brother hadn't been killed it would have been joe kennedy. >> if he didn't make a phone call to martin luther king's wife he would have lost the election. then you look at dallas, the skies clear at the last minute. the bubble top on his car was removed at the very last minute. keep the bubble top up because the rain doesn't stop and the assassin's aim, is thrown off
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just enough to have him survive. then you ask the questions, is the point because not just oh, look what almost happened but what are the consequences of these twists of fate. i couldn't write an alternate history if dukakis beaten bush. it wouldn't have mattered much. if john kennedy is president and you believe as i do he would not have escalated the vietnam war and i research this stuff as much as i can, you read document, you read all history. >> why do you believe that? >> he had won as a hawk. he had gone through the cuban missile crisis which almost incinerated the world. but coming out of the missile crisis he was determined to ease the tensions and he also was skeptical military's aserges that it knew what it was doing. he was a political guy. he kept saying i'm not doing anything about vietnam until i'm re-elected. when you read his impulse, his
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believe in nationalism, his skepticism about the military and his determination always to take the narrowest path -- >> the narrowest path. excuse me. this is an alternate history. didn't kennedy have something to do with the assassination of south vietnam's leader. that's not a narrow path. this was all after the bay of pigs. he didn't seem to have changed that much. >> the coup was the worst mistake of the kennedy administration. happened because aflac of information. nobody really signed off on that. but, yes, he was stuck if he did not sanction a coup those leaders would cut a deal with north. my point he would have stumbled through 1964, avoiding the issue as much as pork not giving barry goldwater red meat and gone back up. >> the most fascinating domestic trend you follow is civil rights. lbj took that baton in the name of jack kennedy.
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what would it have looked like if it was kennedy himself. >> kennedy would have been much more cautious because he didn't know the congress. he wasn't the master of the senate as johnson was and he was a foreign policy president. his only black adviser said you care more about germany than alabama. and it was true. he gets richard russell powerful senator from georgia and a segregationist to say protect my rear as i get out of vietnam and we'll go easy on civil rights. we would have had a vote rights act because that was too important black and whitish. we would have had a great society. that's not how john kennedy thought. johnson wanted to be fdr. in my alternate history johnson would have been kicked out of office because investigations would have continued had kennedy not been murdered. >> do you look at anyone in modern politic, do you look at bush v gore or obama --
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>> die a bush v gore ebook because people demand it. this book ends in 1968. also by the way i should mention take it through john kennedy's private life because tissue of whether his sexual behavior would have become public. we may not want to talk about it. it was a critical public policy issue and i have some things to say about how that might have is your passed a or not. it ends in '68. i find this fascinating. do i think it's a small "twist of fate" with huge consequences. but as my people would say enough already. >> the other thing is in talking about alternate histories, you saw the last week of the 1994 campaign of jeb versus child. jeb lost six, seven, eight points because child just brutalized him. jeb would not punch back. if jeb punched back i don't know many people in politics that
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don't say he would have been president in 2000 instead of his brother. >> the other part i have to say about this -- >> enough already. >> the whole culture of the country changes. you don't have a dark pessimistic student revolt. >> absolutely. >> you have a much kinder gentler counter culture because vietnam drove this country into such divisiveness. >> the book is "if kennedy lived." jeff greenfield thank you very much. congratulations on that. ron fourney thank you as well. >> always great to have you. >> days of fire, journalist peter baker paints the george bush white house, his relationship with dick cheney and how their political relationship evolved through two terms of intense pressure. (vo) you are a business pro.
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i welcome members of my cabinet, the white house staff and administration, especially vice president dick cheney. [ applause ] from the day i asked dick to run with me he served with loyalty, principle, and strength. proud to call you friend. [ applause ] >> that was president george w. bush praising vice president dick cheney at the dedication of his presidential library more than four years after they both left public office and here with us now chief white house correspondent for the "new york times" peter baker. he's out now with a new book "days of fire." it looks amazing and nicole wallace says she has a twitch in her eye from reading all night. >> other people told me that worked in the administration
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that reading it brought back post-traumatic stress disorder. you get right in there. let's talk first of all, here's george w. bush being gracious. their relationship which started close got so bad by the end that they were constantly clashing weren't they? >> winter personal lir bitter relationship but it was a relationship that drifted apart. we had this sort of cartoonish version, i think, of president bush and vice president cheney as if cheney was the puppet master and weak which would president did what he was told. >> never that way. >> it was never that way. always over stated. cheney was influential in the early years. he was an incredibly important figure in that white house. >> did that end after we diana nyad find wmds in iraq? >> exactly. president bush began to see things didn't go well in the war. he saw alliances were frayed.
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we made condoleezza rice a second cheney. by the end of their tenure they are on opposite sides of most issues. iran, lebanon, sir area climate change, gun rights, gay rights, auto bailout. >> what was the impact everybody talks about scooter libby. what was the impact of bush firing in 2006 after the election, firing one of cheney's best friends. >> rumsfield. right before the war starts in march of 2003 president bush is told you can go in early, have this early strike, get saddam hussein. he kicks everybody else out of the room and it's just him and the vice president. that's who he wants to talk to at the very end. by the end of 2006 he decided to replace don rumsfield, contacted bob gates about it without talking to dick cheney. i sktd vice president cheney about it for the book he said by time it got to me that decision was done. a real evolution in the way
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decisions were made. >> what's the single revelation that you think most disspells the caricatures. what's the single thing about president bush that you think is revealed in your pages. >> people have a two dimensional stick version of him. he does change over time. people didn't give him credit for that or see that. partly he didn't want to see that. nicole knows better than i do. he denied there was any difference between the first and second term but there was. he began to shave the harsh edges of his policy because he wanted them to survive. he goes to congress squans and military tribunals. he closes the secret prisons all one pressure because the courts and congress and media have made it hard for him to continue. the vice president is secretly to his view frustratingly fighting inside the white house.
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>> off of nicole's question, we had a had this cartoonish portrait of president bush over the years in the media, largely in the media and yet you hear -- let me ask you, what's the impact, the increasing weight of the disaster that the iraq war became of the casualties on president bush on a daily basis. you hear internally from people who were close to him that the weight was enormous and growing. >> i think as. in writing the book we discovered that he was grinding his teeth so hard that they hurt literally. he would go into these meetings with families that lost people and just sob in a very meaningful way. in front of no cameras, not for public consumption. there were moments he was so down. it feet like he wanted to say stop telling me bad news. when they finally got the main leader in iraq he's glum.
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what's going on. i don't even know how to take good news any more. it was a burden. he didn't want to show it. to be lbj-like teen agonize in a public way would undercut the troops and politics that were hard enough for him at that time. >> misperceptions about the relationship between bush and cheney but how did the relationship change or evolve over those years? >> yeah. i think by the end they have this fight over the scooter libby pardon and a proxy for the frustrating two years they had before then. for cheney that lost so many battles felt bush went off in a different direction. in effect he was asking for validation. this man who worked for me was ill-treated, unjustly convicted. president bush calls his lawyers. he brings him in and says you examine it. they met with scooter libby in a seafood restaurant and came back and said we think the jury had every reason to convict him and the president decided against it
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knowing it would fracture their relationship. you saw that clip at the library and very polite and proper because that's what the bush family is. the truth is they don't talk very often any more. they were never buddy, but they have a very proper but distant relationship today. >> let's talk about speaking of caricatures, let's speak of dick cheney. had a picture of dark vader mask. >> it will come in the archives. >> let's talk about the characterization of him. i remember my first introduction of dick cheney was a book and the republicans were fighting about how far they can go with another round of tax cuts. dick cheney then spoke and said i don't think the american people will take another round of tax cuts. we've done all we can do. stockman said he was so respected it ended the debate. you talk about the giants of washington. the republicans got up and
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walked out of the room because dick cheney was the man everybody listened to. he was still that way during the first gulf war. >> right. >> he was that way in the first bush 43 term. >> he was. >> after 9/11 he took it on himself, i guess, what happened. he took it on himself to say this will never happen again and i will do anything, anything to protect americans from another attack. >> that's exactly right. you have to remember what he had done in 1980s as a congressman he participated in this continuity of government exercises where you literally spear off a few high level people to the mountains of virginia and maryland and pretend a nuclear war just had happened and reconstituted america. what happened on 9/11 was a culmination of years of fear and preparation. it was his pseudo mission and throughout the rest of the presidency that nothing like
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this would happen again. if we had step on toes, water board people or do things other people felt was repungent. president bush felt that way too but he moved away from that, see other priorities and other balances. vice president cheney didn't move away from that. >> isn't it fascinating on the ten year anniversary of the attacks how will new yorkers respond to george w. bush who was not popular. a lot of families respond with a booming ovation. >> that was a moment of strength for him when he went down to ground zero in days after. we have different opinions of the presidency overall but this book is a fascinating look at a relationship as well. dick cheney right now is talking
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about his health. do you look at that along the way and how that play as role? >> yeah. you know, people also speculated his health was part of this notion he changed. >> that's nonsense. >> do i think, those there was a certain fatalism on far of a man who had three heart attacks, four heart attacks that, you know, he didn't have time to waste. >> it does change you. >> it does. it changes you in some sort of psychology -- you have to be empowered to move don't sit there and waste time, and we talk about in the book "days of fire" at the end his energy level was down, his aides noticed it. they scheduled him lighter. he was not off in the oval office but health did have an impact on him especially in the last few years. >> the book is "days of fire." peter baker, thank you very much. >> nicole is still twitching. >> it's so good.
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on every page there's things i knew, things i can't believe you found out and there's things i never knew. >> former vice president dick cheney will be right here on the set this coming monday. so we'll talk with him. coming up netflix cements its status as a dominant player as a subscriber. that's next on "morning joe". at a ford dealer with a little q and a for fiona. tell me fiona, who's having a big tire event? your ford dealer. who has 11 major brands to choose from? your ford dealer. who's offering a rebate? your ford dealer. who has the low price tire guarantee, affording peace of mind to anyone who might be in the market for a new set of tires? your ford dealer. i'm beginning to sense a pattern. get up to $140 in mail-in rebates when you buy
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♪ i asked the ref represented once, what are we supposed to do in the face of so much senseless pain and he said to me, what else can we do? but take what seems meaningless and try to make something meaningful it from. >> am in here because i am no different from anybody else in here. i made bad choices, i committed a crime. and being in here is no one's fault but my own.
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>> netflix has gambled with original content appears to have paid off. the company's net income quadrupled during the third quarter as number of subscribers worldwide soared past 40 million people. 31 million of those subscribers are in the u.s. alone. that's more than 2 million more than hbo. net income for the quarter hit 32 million four times more than it earned during the same period last year and netflix's revenue rose by 22% to hit $1.1 billion. the announcement sent shares up nearly 10% in after hours trading. brian? >> brian, unbelievable turn around. ash year ago, they were sending pathetic emails please come back to netflix. please. we'll give you a free milkshake at mcdonald's. please. please. you would get one of those things. they are not sending those e-mails out any more. >> we talked about reed hastings and left them for dead.
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they are not. now moving forward the stock price has quadrupled. is its justified. they are going to only do two seasons of "house of cards." you get access to some programming, push subscribes around the release and helps bi binge watchers. what's behind "house of cards," what's behind "orange is the new black." they are talking to cable companies about getting real estate on their systems to deliver the goods. and so like the model is so different from what we originally were ridiculing them for like the dvd business and now they have changed the way we consume media. >> original content. this changes everything. jeff bukus when he did "band ever brothers" on hbo that was a
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revolution. is that revolution. >> they have become the tip of the spear. a year ago, two years ago they were flat lined. they have come back with these two pivotal movies "house of cards" and "orange is the new black." google and other companies are going to copy netflix. they will get into the movie business. >> amazon is already producing stuff. >> it's changing the entire nature of delivery. up next michael hainey has the new issue of "gq." >> your excited? >> in it anthony weiner provides an alternate history of his own as in what could have been if the internet didn't exist. plus confessions of an american drone warrior. we'll be right back.
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♪ 45 past the hour. welcome back. i do like michael hainey. the latest issue of "gq" magazine is on new stands now and includes an in depth interview with anthony weiner following his disastrous campaign for mayor of new york city. he tells "gq," quote, i'll say this, i have no desire to walk into a bar and pick up a woman. i love my wife and maybe if the internet didn't exist, like if i was running for mayor in 1955 i would probably get elected mayor. and joining us now is the magazine's deputy editor, michael hainey. >> wow, michael. >> you sound incredulous. >> i'm sure you'll clear this up. >> he also said i'm an empty soul vessel. >> has he said that? >> yes. it came at the end. it's a great piece because we were on trail with him the whole time and saw this meltdown and i
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think, you know, what's fascinating -- >> the guy could have won but for the twitter thing. >> his point is if i was in a pre-technology world i would have done very well. >> if he just not used technology the way de. this is a guy for ten years people are saying he's going mayor. democratic fundraiser a decade ago. >> no, no, no. in 1955 he would have walked around naked in a rain coat flashing women on a subway. this is a guy with problems. this is not a guy who was corrupted by the internet. >> pee we her man got in trouble before the internet. >> does anybody think the trouble with anthony weiner is he had an internet connection? >> there's good anthony and bad anthony. >> both anthonys would have flashed his goods to women in 1940s or '50s if he didn't have access to the computer.
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mi miley cyrus has her stuff together. >> it's guys who are able to compartmentalize their existence in politics. >> you actually have the last page of something that was very helpful for me in law school. going to mcdonald's on -- it was like the most depressing thanksgiving ever eating a big mac and going back to the law library and studying. this could be for anthony weiner, what to do when you spend thanksgiving alone. what does "gq" tell us? >> maximizing your time alone and renting your netflix "house of cards" and binge watching. >> you teach gentlemen of today, because i guess need help with this. rugged style. how to look rough and ready all
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year long. michael. >> we need hire you to do a voice activated cover line reading. >> he's rough and ready. >> let me explain something to you. >> he's working hard. >> here's the problem. men work too hard looking rough and ready and it doesn't look pretty. it's not attractive. it's not rough and ready it's made up. it's too quite frankly contrived. >> i was saying before the break -- >> they have to be -- >> how would you describe joe's style. >> wouldn't call it rough and ready. >> he looks very -- >> he's casual and ready. >> yeah. you know -- >> the thing is i usually have food all over me so it's hard to say i'm calculated. >> what your deal breakers? >> don't like it when men work too hard -- like this guy. sorry. >> she likes authentic rough and
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ready. >> i'm going put sweat on my chest. >> it was a hard cover shoot. >> they are getting their picture taken. >> you are not rough and ready these guys of today. >> there is the food issue. >> the book -- she's going to be ben affleck's mistress in a movie. >> after she gets off the hamburger she's sitting on. >> or away from the ice cream cone. >> she has a of talent. >> he was quiet. now he perks up. >> let's talk about confessions of a drum warrior.
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tell us about it. >> if you saw the front page of the "new york times" there's a big story. fantastic piece. we got a story about a guy who was a drone pilot, in the u.s. air force. 60% of americans support this strategy right now. they don't realize the cost to our people. this guy is responsible by the military's calculation for more than 600 kills. what's fascinating he and guys like him are not eligible for ptsd treatment because they are not in active combat >> he couldn't talk to people for weeks after the first missile hit,er can't pull over to the side of the road without crying. >> so they don't see come bamt yet sometimes he's flying for 18 hours a day if you read these stories. >> drinks himself to black out. >> these are our american service people. it's a tremendously powerful
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story about this new wave of warfare. >> has no cost to our servicemen and 60% of americans support it because it's clean. there's nothing clean about what happens not only here but more tragically what happens on the other side of the drone hits. this removal, this dispassionate space between the killing and the be fact that it did affect him that much is the biggest eye opener that it affected him at all. always good to see you. >> on tomorrow's show we'll talk to al lighter.
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warren buffett and "60 minutes" correspondent steve you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the new twin turbo xts from cadillac. 410 available horses. ♪ room for four. twice the fun. ♪ ♪
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♪ fewer than 1 in 10 people who tried to sign up in the first week were actually able to complete the process, a success rate of less than 10%. how low is it? according to a recent poll, more of this country believes obama care has been repealed than have been able to sign up for obama
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care. the whole point of websites is to design them so that it is nearly impossible to not sign up for something. every time i go on a.m.son, there's a 40% chance i'll overnight myself six seasons of "night court." it's just the way it's designed! are you sure you want to leave this page? e yes, i am. oops, turns out i ordered something. >> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city. back with us on set, we have nicole wallace, mike barnicle, and in washington eugene robinson. >> eugene -- >> what? >> seriously. that's what you do. >> good point. >> president of the united states and you can call anybody, right? i mean, nixon even called elvis, got him over to the white house. >> okay. >> i'm serious. this is how leaders think. let's see, i'm doing this. >> anything is possible. with your help. >> leaders are usually dressed
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before they get to work. >> you can call anybody and you call bezos. listen, i see that you can actually run america now from your app on my iphone. >> right. >> i can buy anything i want in america. can you make it so people can sign up? >> right. >> but the floppy disk thing, you give me 35 floppy disk, i have those, right, and eni have the eight-set, you know, dvd set of "the bible." the miniseries. i have it all right there. i just say lei it out. right? maybe if i had some slim whitmans on. >> okay. >> the president was pitching yesterday. he was giving out the 800 number, doing the whole thing. buy the full set. >> he gives out the 800 number. >> stop it. >> they call. >> we're getting there. >> they can't get through. you get through the first layer, what do they tell them to do? >> visit the website. >> i think you're on to something because amazon eventually carries everything, so maybe amazon could start
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selling obama care because in the beginning a.m.son only had a few products but now literally anything you want from anywhere else, the amazon website's better, if you're amazon prime, you don't have to reenter your information. maybe amazon.com could carry obama care. >> we're not even talking about the final product. we're talking about signing up. i ordered shoes on here. so on amazon, order shoe, got my shoes. people say just shoes. right. we're just talking about the order. >> right. you can't even get through the order. >> really quickly, i just want to ask one question really quickly. if the president of the united states, when your communication director goes out there and you write in there, don't call this number, all right, and then everybody calls this number, all news organizations, and it's busy, and it keeps staying busy and then when people get through, they say go back to the
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website, i'm just curious. what would w say to y'all? >> not a good day to be the communications director who wrote that number into the president's remarks. >> we'll start this morning with the front-page headline in "usa today." congress control may be up for grabs. according to a "usa today" princeton survey poll, 47% of americans say congress would work better if every member was replaced next year during the midterm elections. only 4% say congress would be changed for the worse if all members for replaced. the rest think it would make no difference. that figure is similar to but still higher than past election years when the minority party won control of the house in 1994, when democrats lost the house, that number was at 40%. according to cnn opinion research poll, 75% of americans believe republican members of congress do not deserve to be re-elected. 54% say the same for democrats. this follows a government
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shutdown mess that was led in large part by ted cruz. when asked if the senator should keep his mouth shut, the head of the chamber of commerce said, quote, that might be one thing we could work on. just last week, the cook political report said 14 seats that are up for grabs next year are now leaning democrat because of the damage done to the gop. so obviously some of these number, gene, are not surprising. what are the opportunities here? >> well, you know, the opportunity is potentially to take back control of the house. which did not seem to be even remotely in the cards for democrats, frankly, before the shutdown and this whole drama. and to put it back in play, perhaps just as important it tends to take the senate out of play for the party. but this was politically a very bad thing for republican party. but it's time.
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things can change. >> we're asking in the polls about how much you hate congress now. would you line up every member and shoot them in the back of the head into an unmarked zblaif 47% said yes. nobody likes congress. nicole, does this have big impacts in 2014 or is the other side of the argument it will be forgotten by then and it will be about something else than's what's happening right now? >> i find the pace of the news cycles disorienting. if you remember that 11 weeks ago all that we talked about here i think for maybe a whole three hours was obama's very muddled leadership on the red line he'd drawn for syria. so i think it's a little disorienting how consumed we get by -- i think the nature of governing by crisis is that you can't predict the effects on
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public opinion of these all-consuming news cycles. >> and think about it when people go to the voting booth. this is what we've got to figure out. as you're looking at this, think about the message on the government shutdown. government doesn't work, right? >> right. >> this comes on the heels of syria and the red line, the nsa. these nsa stories -- >> drone stories this morning. >> drone story that's come out this morning. the irs story that's come out. the app story. the james rosen story. bengha benghazi. there's one after another after another after another. >> but billions of dollars wasted by republicans shutting town the government. there's that, too. on the other side. >> there is that, too. >> billions and billions of dollars. >> it is so -- there are so many of these stories, though, the question is what at the end of the day do people hold on to? >> and what conclude do they draw? mika, i don't disagree with you about the e effects of the
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shutdown. >> and on the economy. i was watching -- >> when was the last time that was used? >> i was watching my daughter's soccer game yesterday afternoon and a guy comes up to me. he had the bad taste of having a 10-year-old at the other side he was cheering for, but he said hey, you know, what do you think, talking about halftime. and he's a business guy. >> yeah. >> and he's always been republican. he said, i'm not supporting these people, and my friends aren't supporting these people anymore until they stop governing by crisis every two months. >> right. >> he was, like, we can't -- he was, like, i can't figure out what to do with the next three months, six months, nine months. that's another thing. >> and if those voices rise up and the nary thaich they string together is that this democrat-led senate and democratic president have contributed to that economic
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insecurity or lack of ability to predict and make business decisions, that doesn't necessarily accrue to the democrats' benefit either. i think we're in a position where neither party should be resting on their laurels and heading into the midterms with confidence because i think both sides -- i think the public is pretty fed up, obviously at the moment more so with republicans but i don't think the public holds either side in high esteem. >> you have to ask yourself, don't you, gene, the poll numbers we just saw, it's such a generic question that's been asked for years and people always answer the same way, hate what congress is doing, they're ineffective, inefficient, tet yet they end up liking their own member of congress and re-electing their own member of congress. >> that's been the eternal result of those polls, and as a result we get the same old congress. occasionally though there's a wave. and, you know, there was the tea party wave and before that there was the democratic wave. joe, you came in on a wave. so these things do --
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>> amazing what waves bring in. >> isn't it. >> it was great until we created another wave because we did what people just did a couple weeks ago. >> exactly. and these are wave numbers right now. it's a long time, but these are wave numbers. >> mika, if this was happening, we had these numbers a year from now, we could say with confidence that congress was going to get routed. >> i actually think long term there may be some opportunity if the party would actually take the advice of some of the people in it who like to actually win elections. >> i don't see that happening right now. >> i don't see it happening right now. i still see a complete and utter blindness amongst some members. >> when i see online over the weekend people actually at some respected conservative parts saying the reason this didn't work was because the senate
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didn't stand united with ted cruz -- >> do they not understand the process? >> it is such complete willful ig new orleans or they are lying so their sub vibers will get excited. even if they had stood shoulder to sthoerld president would have vetoed it. they could have -- i mean, they couldn't have overridden the a veto. they could never do a majority. they were never going to do that. even if all the senators -- so instead of saying, listen, we should have listened to you guys, we screwed up, and we lost 20 percentage points in our approval rate sogs we have the lowest approval ratings ever. they don't have to say that i was right, because i was. walker or tom coburn or all of were wright, t"the wall street journal" editorial page, you don't have to say they're right. just kind of be quiet, you know, clean the room, learn from their
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mistakes, and stop being stupid, i'm cool. let's just pretend it never happened and work towards winning next time. they won't do it. >> you've been saying that for a few years. >> now they're saying we were right, we were right. they weren't right. constitutionally. the great irony of these people, oh, i love the constitution, why don't you just read the first three articles in the constitution and call me in the morning? >> review. >> review. >> joe and nicole, who in the republican party has enough of a voice, the strength of voice to stand up and tell people like ted cruz, look at what we missed by doing the government shutdown? look at -- >> thiey don't listen. they listen to the money people. when the money people come in and say to some of these guy, i know you got 60 -- i know you're ahead 60-40, your district, i'm going to come and find a primary
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opponent, and guess what, he's going to be pro-life, he's going to be pro gun, he's going to be pro family, he's going to be pro tax cuts, but he's going to be a business man or a business woman that's not going to put a gun to my business's head every three months. and i'm just going to keep finding 30-second commercials and we're going to gut you. that's when it starts to have an impact. they're not going to listen to jeb. hell, they're not listening to chris christie. they're not listening to anybody. >> what's clear, though, is that people like ted cruz are not worried about what you're talking about. it's the republican brand. they're not worried about a national brand or what's happening to the party. teld cruz goes back to texas, saw the pictures yesterday, his approval rating is 70%. he's not thinking big picture. >> this is about ted cruz and he had an interview yesterday and a lot of people didn't see it, but he had an interview yesterday where he actually showed his hand for the first-time where he
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said i know about negotiating, i wanted to take the hard line, and then i wanted somebody to come in behind me and take a more pragmatic position. he wasn't sayinging that on this 30-second commercial. and he was skewering a lot of people that could have been pragmatic and come in with let's say a deal in the middle. >> right. >> but i think you're going to slowly see -- yeah, there are 8,000 people -- ted cruz doesn't want to just be senator the rest of his life. and he knows he's got to make that turn. how do i know? i know. because i know people like ted cruz. >> does he know he's done damage to our country? >> no. >> does he know he's done damage -- >> not yet. >> billions of dollars? >> you know what, there are a lot of people that believe that ted cruz has brought this to the forefront. so -- and our country is a big -- it's a resilient country and i guarantee you there are democrats and liberals, nicole, that have done worse things to our country and we've somehow
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managed to survive. you will survive a shutdown. >> i don't think we can afford another one, and i don't think we can afford another government by crisis. and everyone says it can't happen again. i want to know how it doesn't given the -- given the -- >> better not. >> it's not the end of the world as we know it, but i will tell you this, it could be the end of the republican party's chances in '14 and '16. that's the thing. they're just hurting themselves. >> yeah. >> i remember talking to one of my college professors. i was a huge ronald reagan fan and i made the mistake of asking, so what do you think about reagan? you know, because reagan was way ahead. he goes, i think the united states of america is strong enough to survive even eight years of ronald reagan. i was so crestfallen. but it was a revelation to me that he thought the world, gene, was going to the -- going to hell the same time i thought this was the greatest thing that
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had ever happened for country. and we will survive this shutdown or that shutdown, but what so many of my friends on my side don't realize, they're just hurting themselves. >> yeah. >> they're setting themselves up. we've seen this before so many times. they're setting themselves up for a democratic monopoly in washington, d.c., in 2014. >> yeah. they're really -- they're trying their best to take themselves, you know, out of this gig, take themselves off the field, and they're being egged on by some voices that either didn't exist or in previous times like this or that have changed, like the heritage foup dags, for example, which, you know, you would think ought to be coming out with those sort of reasonable policies.ould think ought to be out with those sort of reasonable policies. you would expect heritage to to say here's republican idea for
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health care. here is our idea for something that's better than obama care, and it would have assumed that we have a problem and here's a way to solve it. in fact, they did that years ago and came um with romney care/obama care, but they don't believe that anymore, but they want to come up with something new. now they're, like, one of the loudest voices thanks to jim demint and heritage, which used to be a real think tank, is is now this kind of shrill voice that's not helping. >> coming up on "morning joe," another installment of this morning's politico playbook. and apple is expected to roll out its new ipad today. how the latest device stacks up against its competitors. plus ringo starr is trying to solve a mystery nearly 50 years in the making. we'll show you the photograph that has the former beatle asking for the public's help. but first zmoosh that's a tease. >> bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> just watch the tease. >> good morning, guys.
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as far as the forecast goes, all eyes in acapulco over the last 24 hour, huge hurricane, as strong as we've seen in north america this season. thankfully it's starting to weaken but it's drifting near the resort town, 115-mile-per-hour winds. as far as the lower 48 goes, the cold air on the way as advertised, the northern plains gets it today through the great lakes. right now in chicago, 16 degrees colder at this hour than it was this time yesterday. and look at the windchill right now, 26 in indianapolis, cleveland, detroit, all through the chicago area. definitely need the winter coat and the hat and the gloves. a little snow this morning moving down from minnesota to areas of northern iowa. maybe the quad cities and see some of the first snowflakes of the season. as far as the rest of the forecast goes, we're looking pretty nice for one more day on the east coast. i don't expect a lot of airport problems. light rain in jacksonville, late today in orlando. as far as st. louis goes, the world series games take place tomorrow and thursday night in
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boston. it will be cold for your baseball team while you also are waking up to a nice chilly morning. you're watching "morning joe." for seeing your business in a whole new way. for seeing what cash is coming in and going out... so you can understand every angle of your cash flow- last week, this month, and even next year. for seeing your business's cash flow like never before, introducing cash flow insight powered by pnc cfo. a suite of online tools that lets you turn insight into action.
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time to take a look at the morning papers. las vegas review journal, another community was coming to grips with a school shooting that has left two people dead including the shooter. it happened in the town of sparks, nevada, yesterday around 7:00 a.m. an armed student opened fire on two classmates killing the math
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teacher who tried to protect them. he then turned the gun on himself. the two wounded students are in stable condition. michael landsberry, the teacher who faced down the gunman, is being hailed as a hero. a former marine and national guardsman, he leaves behind a wife and two stepdaughters. he was 45. the "chicago sun-times," a woman is taking twitter to court after her daughter was bullied on the social media site. she wants to company to reveal who the bullies were. she was accused of being fat, listed her phone number and ebb couraged others to send her sexts. those casualties have been suspended. "the washington post," netflix says profits quadrupled in the third quarter creating a jump in shares. the online video streaming service gained more than a million new subscribers in the u.s. bringing its total to 40 million users worldwide. its success can be linked to original content like house of
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cards and orange is the new black. >> from the "san francisco chronicle," apple is expected to announce new gadgets for the holiday season today to showcase in san francisco. insiders anticipate the ipad 5 and an ipad mini with a retina display and an eight-inch screen. the tech giant also may provide a release date for its new operating system for mac computers as well as a new lineup of mac book pro laptops. >> "chicago sun-times," the headstone of an iraq war veteran was removed by officials at an ohio cemetery who say the marker is inappropriate for the historic grounds. the seven-foot gravestone is shaped like a smiling spongebob square pants wearing an army uniform. it belongs to kimberly walker who died after leaving the military. the cemetery says is the employee who approved the design made a, quote, inexplicable error in judgment. officials are offering the
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family compensation for the gravestone and an identical one next to it. >> the "salt lake tribune," the boy scouts fire two leaders who filmed themselves toppling an ancient boulder in the utah state park. the men said they tossed the boulder because they were worried it could fall on somebody. but the boy scouts say the leaders violated the leave no trace rule where natural areas are spoetzed to be preserved for future jgenerations. the men could still face criminal charges. "usa today," ringo starr is asking for help on his quest to find the identities of the people in this photo. ringo took the photo during the beatles' first trip to the u.s. back in 1964 when their cars passed each other on the freeway. it's part of his new limited edition photo book called photograph. he believes it may have been taken in miami. if you recognize anyone in the photo, held over the genesis publications website and let them know. >> what a cool photo. imagine, 1964, the beatles at the -- >> so cool. >> the peak of the frenzy.
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driving down the road and ringo starr takes your picture. that's a great shot. let's go to willie now with politico. >> really cool shot there. let's go to politico and the playbook editor in chief, jon harr harris. good morning. >> good morning, willie. >> you guys have a piece up about the virginia race. michael mayer is getting involved puffering money from his group into the race. how will it impact things? >> he's going to drop $1.1 million, not just pocket change here in virginia where terry mcauliffe, a bill clinton friend and a democrat is up over conservative republican ken cuccinelli. you know, i don't really see this having a huge effect on the race. i must say i find it a little surprising. terry mcauliffe went up and sort of paid homage to mike bloomberg in august so presumably he's happy for this help. i've been covering virginia 25 years. the idea of a cultural new york
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mayor having a positive impact for a democrat in the state seems a puzzle. >> that was my question. if you've got an eight-point spread with two weeks to go, we know terry mcauliffe courted mayor bloomberg, came to new york city and asked for him to get involved. >> right. >> do you think that's wise with an eight-point lead? >> we'll definitely see. mccauliff's positions on gun control, if you go issue by issue are popular. but the last thing he wants to do, especially still battling the carpetbagger reputation in virginia, the last thing you want to be doing is seen as kind of a national democrat rather than a virginia democrat. so i would really see this as at best a toss-up. to be honest, the last thing you want to be is mark prior out in arkansas where bloomberg's money really create ags backlash and helps republicans. >> obviously the cuccinelli campaign is jumping on this saying tens of millions of outside dollars coming into our state to restrict our gun rights. >> return on investment. >> exactly. another interesting piece you guys have this morning.
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you interviewed house minority leader nancy pelosi. she says she is, quote, on a mission. what did she mean by that? >> on a mission, not a shift. read between the lines. i'm not going anywhere. a lot of people wondering pelosi at her age, in her early 70s, maybe she's sort of on the last lap. she gave us the exact opposite impression and so did some of her associates in the house, people that know her. they think she wants to stay certainly through obama's term and possibly beyond. she is buoyed in the wake of a shutdown. she thinks the democrats have a better chance than ever to take back the house, certainly in 2014 if not 2016. she clearly wants to stick around until she's speaker again. >> coming up, live coverage of the monthly jobs report that was delayed by more than two weeks because of the government shutdown. cnbc's kelly evans will have those numbers. and harvard professor hnry louis gates here to share his groundbreaking new series on african-american history. we'll preview the project next.
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okay. >> what are you talking about? >> we've got to get to breaking news, the monthly jobs report just crossed. let's go to cnbc's kelly evans. kelly? >> good morning. a lot of interesting things going on here. the headline is probably going to be the disappointment for september in terms of hiring. this is the delayed jobs report because of the shutdown. that means it captures the data before the bulk of the shutdown really hits. it was our last clean read on how the economy was doing. frankly the news isn't all that encouraging. the headline number showed that payrolls increased by 140,000 for the month, well shy of the 180,000 and 200,000 number some were looking for on the street. in the meantime, there were revisions. july was revised much lower to a gain of 89,000 from 104,000. august was revised higher to 193,000. so those krotsz currents are playing out. that's one survey. there's a separate survey that tells you what's going on with the nation's unemployment rate and what that showed and this is a trend we've seen playing out this year with a little bit of an improvement. 7.2%.
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the unemployment rate fell in the month of september even though fewer people than we thought were employed. so what's going on? it all comes down to what's happening in the labor force. while it will take some time to dig through the guts of this 50-page report, usually, what often happens is that fewer people are frankly coming into the labor force looking for work. so you can have a situation where fewer people are looking for work but the unemployment rate falls and that's what we're looking at for september. >> thank jim for sticking his head in. >> jim says hi. >> like your head, dude. >> they can see you over there. ? thank you so much, kelly appreciate it. i will tell you, most americans looking at this who aren't wall street analysts, they'll see 7.2. you know what they're going to say? even with the shutdown, even with the chaos in washington, that number's going down. >> right. if it gets under 7 then we get back where the fed come into play to pull things back with quantitative easing. the key take-away with the shutdown garbage is the economy is still growing but it is not
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strong. we strip it all down, even with all the sugar in the water, we are not growing fast. >> we've had analysts talking about we need 200,000 new jobs a month to get back to where we want to be. we have a new normal now, especially when we have government by crisis every three months, that's the new normal. >> can i say quickly this is where education is huge because some people think we've lost a generation of workers, that they will never get back to the income levels they were at and never find the groove they had ten years ago. so if we don't have the kids coming through the pipeline able to have the skills to get the jobs that are available, we will continue that past the generations. >> the problem, we have an energy revolution going on, manufacturing is coming back to america, and the fact of the matter is that we have been -- like the single track. you either go to the best colleges on the planet or else you don't. people look down on, you know -- in the past, people went to vo
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tech schools. guess what? that's what america needs right now. those jobs are coming. we want the best and the brightest at the best schools. but the vo tech men and women over the next five, ten years or these job jobs are going to go elsewhere. >> brian, thank you. up next, professor henry louis gates takes viewers on a 500-year journey through african-american history. his impressive new series premieres tonight. we're going to get an early look next on "morning joe." as your life changes, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college,
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with this visual evidence, houston began building a legal case against jim crow, showing just how unequal education was between black and white students in america. >> they would film a black school. often it would be in just shacks, you know, places that had cracks in the walls and children crowded on the benches, no desks. and then he would go to the white school, neighboring white school. two-story, brick, basketball courts. so here's this astounding visual essay. and he used it to inform people around the country and to help mobilize black people to fight for their children's futures. >> that was a clip from the upcoming pbs six-hour series "the african-americans: many rivers to cross with henry louis gates." here with us now, the series' executive producer, writer, and presenter, harvard university professor henry louis gates. welcome aboard this morning. ? thank you. good morning. >> this looks incredible.
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>> very excited about it. took us seven years. and we used 40 historians. we wanted to be impeccably researched. i took the historians on location to the historical sites rather than interviewing them in their offices or in the studios. >> what were you setting out to do? >> well, first i wanted to tell the full history of the african-american people in the united states. and it turns out that the first african-american, the first african arrived in the united states in 1513, exactly 500 years ago. every other history, every other documentary about african-american history has started in 1619 with the arrival of the first 20 angolans in jamestown. we found out the first african -- we found out his name, juan garrido, and he wasn't eve an slave. he was a black conquistador came with ponce de leon in search of the town table of youth.
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we go from juan garrido to barack obama's second inauguration. >> you talk about the 500 years of the african-american experience in america. it reminds me of, you know, when you learn that for 2,000 years it took the same amount of time to get from rome to paris. and then everything change sod quickly. here you go 450 of those 500 years, nothing happened, and even, god, for 4 0 of those 500 years nobody would ever believe there would have been an african-american president. >> no. an exponential change. a paradigm shift. so quickly. >> what caused it? >> i think the civil rights movement. the success of the civil rights movement led to the birth of affirmative action. and i'll give you an example of the importance of affirmative action. i entered yale in 1969 with 96 black men and women. you know how many graduated from yale this in '6 6, three years before?
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six. there were racist quotas on the number of black people who could matriculate at what i call historically white colleges and universities. and now you're seeing our generation come of age. and barack obama's part of that larger sweep. all of us have been produced by the gains made possible by affirmative action. since the terrible day of dr. king's assassination in 1968 the black upper middle class has quadrupled. but here's the kicker. at the same time the percentage of black children living at or beneath the black poverty line is about in the mid-30s, about what it was when dr. king was -- two classes within the black community. >> you said something fascinating about class, too. we were talking off camera about where america needs to go in the future. you think affirmative action needs to be redirected? >> i do. i think that far lot of reasons, political and also practical and economic, we should think about affirmative action for the poor. and i grew up in west virginia with poor white people. they need affirmative action as
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much as my people do. and i think it would be a thing to reconsider. also i'm upper middle class. my daughter was born at yale-new haven hospital. they have a privileged life. do they really need to benefit from affirmative action? affirmative action was a class escalator when i went to yale, and i think it still should be. so i want to get more more black people into the middle class and i want to get more poor white people in the middle class as well. >> talk a bit more about the class distinction within the black community. we obviously talked somewhat about class distinctions in the white community, but in the black community, for instance, the knowledge of the history that is presented in this series, if you go to a street corner in certain sections of boston and new york, cambridge, massachusetts, and you talk to a young black person, 14, 15, you say who are your heros? you get lebron james perhaps, somebody like that, you wouldn't get henry louis gates. talk about that class distinction that separates
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unfortunately a certain percentage of young blacks from people like you. >> well, i don't think i rank as a hero, but they could say w.e.d. dubois or phyllis wheatley or harriet tubman. the problem is twofold -- the schools and i think our own private institutions within the african-american community. the southern poverty law center published a survey recently just looking at how well states -- public education, how well those states teach the civil rights movement. you think the one thing that schools could get right would be the recent civil rights movement. think of mlk day. how many times do you hear "i have a dream." only three states got an a. only three states got a b. 35 states got an f, including california. so we need to integrate african-american content into the public school system because that, mike, is where we shape citizens. think about the stuff you learned in first grade, mike, my ton country 'tis of thee, i
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pledge allegiance to the flag. nobody says today we're going to teach you how to be a citizen. they just teach you how to be a citizen. conversations about race never work because people feel good after one-day town meeting and two weeks later there's another racist incident. we need to have conversations about the race os mottally without having a banner or a neon sign up. we need to integrate that content. and so also i think our private institutions within the race like sunday schools. i think sunday schools should function like hebrew schools. my jewish friends say you don't know what you're talking act, but my fantasy is hebrew school is where jewish kids go and learn about jewish culture and history. why shouldn't our sunday schools or organizations like jack and jill teach computer skills and black history skills? because if we wait for someone else to do it we e beal waiting for godot. you're obvious right. and i made this documentary
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series in order to provide teachers with a tool, a six-hour dvd and a companion book so that that content can be integrated seamlessly, whether it's pre-k up to college level black history or american history voices. >> do you think the conversation about race in this country are better now after 5 1/2 years of our first african-american president, or do you think that conversation has deteriorated? do you think kids today around their own dinner tables and most families in america are hearing a better, more constructive conversation about race? or do you think the conversation has been degraded? >> i think it's in the most cosmopolitan generation of teenagers in the history of the world, highly technological, very comfortable with race. i don't think they see race in the way -- >> but they're our hope. >> yeah. they're our hope. that niece why we need to have fornal knowledge structures and mechanism in the classroom, because black culture, since soul train, one of the things we
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talk about, is the e effect of soul train on shaping american popular culture so, in the last episode we have a whole sequence of don cornelius and "soul train" because it made american popular culture black. they're comfortable with black superheroes. they just don't have the knowledge base in order to understand the history of slavery and its effects, which are still lingering, the history of a century of jim crow, which are still lingering. and all of us need a better understanding. conversations are fine, these emotional conversations, but we need something sustained. >> it is, though, about time, though, isn't it. we're not so far apart as far as years go, but, you know, the world you saw was so much radically different than when i started first grade in read, mississippi. we were integrated in 1969. and so when i saw barack obama
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being elected, white guys who are ten years older than me were crying, i looked at the screen and i go, i went to law school with that guy, what's the big deal? my son -- >> white cries are crying for the wrong reason. >> i'm talking the white guys were crying, can you believe what happened, we've come such a long way since i saw somebody, you know, beat en in the streets. >> i see. >> but what i'm saying is for me, i saw barack obama -- >> i was worried. >> i saw barack obama and said i went to law school with that guy. what's the big deal? and my son and this generation, my son heard somebody, you know, make a racist comment in this group and he laughed. he said, you were being ironic, right? you weren't -- and then he just looked at him and everybody turned -- it's changed. i mean, but it's changing exponentially like you said, too, isn't it. >> but in times of economic peril, where people people scarce fi, they start to demonize. look at the history of
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anti-semitism, economic based. the history of anti-racism, home phobia, sexism, when economic crises occur, the level of hatred goes up p thap's what we're seeing all too often in the united states. we have a sequence in this series. we go to the jim crow museum at a university in michigan. they already have a wing of racist images of president obama. look at the tee party. i do think that some people in the tea party are motivated by concern about big government, which is fair enough. but i also think that for a lot of these guys, at least subconsciously, the fact that a black man is the most powerful man in the world drives them nuts. >> we've got to go, but quickly, you were with our friend tavis last night. >> yep. >> tavis and cornell. being kind of tough on the president, aren't they. >> no one's criticism. >> right. >> sometimes i think they go a little too far. >> very diplomatic answer.
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all right. you can understand more, which is a greater understanding that comes with talking about the african-americans, many rivers to cross premieres tonight at 8:00 p.m. on pbs. look forward to it. henry louis gates, thank you very, very much. >> thank you. >> well eel 'll be right back. customer erin swenson ordered shoes from us online but they didn't fit. customer's not happy, i'm not happy.
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all right. coming up on tomorrow's show, look at this. look who's here. al leiter. one of the greats. one of the greats. >> warren buffett. and "60 minutes" correspondent steve krovt talking act his new report on members of congress profiting. up next, what if anything did we learn today? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. find out more at aflac.com. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. for sein a whole new way. for seeing what cash is coming in and going out...
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so cute. >> time to talk about what we learned. >> if you projected where michael wiener would be in the '50s, maybe she can project where all of us would have been in the '50s. >> oh, god. please don't. >> mika brzezinski being a '50s style personality. >> what have you learned, mike? >> i learned that nicole just crushed me on my dog loving capacity. i love dogs! >> i don't know. >> nicole says you can't like michael vick and dogs. >> you can. >> i think you can. he's rehabilitated himself. he cares about the dogs. >> i don't believe you can change -- >> mercy. >> he two who sfring

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